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1956-68: Crisis and Recovery

The year that saw the erection of Laurence Bradshaw's powerful monument to Karl Marx in Highgate Cemetery also shook the international Communist movement to its foundations.

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1951-56: A British Road to Socialism

In January 1951, the Communist Party's executive committee published a new programme, The British Road to Socialism, for discussion. Its main propositions had been extensively discussed and agreed with Stalin and the Soviet leadership, although the most significant features had already emerged in previous British congress resolutions and Party publications.

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1945-51: From Victory to Cold War

As the war drew to a close, the Communist Party called for a Labour-led coalition to win the peace, before switching to support an outright Labour victory in the 1945 General Election.

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1939-45: A People's Peace, The People's War

As late as July 1939, Britain and France had failed to agree to the Soviet Union's requests for an alliance against Germany. On the contrary, the Chamberlain government had pursued a policy of appeasing Hitler and the Nazis, allowing them to annexe Austria and then seize Czechoslovakia. The right-wing Polish government had long rejected Soviet offers of assistance.

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1936-1939: "No Passaran!"

In the 1930s, Communists across Europe rose to the challenge of fascism: 'the open terrorist dictatorship of the most reactionary, most chauvinistic and most imperialist elements of finance capital', as Comintern secretary Georgi Dimitrov defined it.

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